Homomonument, Amsterdam

There are a few monuments around the world dedicated to those who lost their lives to the Nazis, particularly in the concentration camps. While the first group of people who spring to mind when thinking of concentration camps are Jewish people, they were just one of the many groups persecuted.Amsterdam

Another on the Nazi hit list were homosexuals. As the Jewish people were forced to wear a yellow star, homosexuals were forced to wear a pink triangle. And it is just so fitting that in one of the most liberal cities in the world, there is a monument to commemorate those who lost their lives.

AmsterdamHidden in plain sight on the Keizersgracht canal, there are three 10 metre triangles – one raised above the ground, one flush with the ground and another sloping down into the canal. Each triangle is pink, and a pink brick line runs between the corners of each, creating a larger triangle.

Subtle, yet definitely there.

AmsterdamI hadn’t heard of the Homomonument before I visited Amsterdam, and it was only as I stood on the bridge over the canal that I saw the sign, and then noticed the triangle stepping down to the water. Looking to the side, I then saw a larger triangle that people were sitting on. As I wandered over to look closer, it was then that I saw the street level triangle, and the line of bricks connecting them all.DSC00593_fotor

It’s small things like this monument that remind you of all the different people who suffered under the Nazi regime, and it’s also one of the reasons I love to travel – to not only see the stunning buildings and eat the delicious food, but also to find out what it was like for the people who lived in that city and to find out about the history and culture of a place.

Top Tips

  • As you walk from Dam Square to the Anne Frank House or Jordaan, you’ll likely pass the Homomonument. Keep an eye out, it’s not in-your-face obvious.
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